An Early Morning at Folsom Lake

Early Morning at Folsom Lake; Doton’s Point,
Folsom Lake State Recreation Area, Folsom, CA; MAR 2019

This past week, we had a morning where the rain clouds were breaking up in the early morning. I chose that day to explore Doton’s Point trail at Folsom Lake Recreation Area; a trail that was new to me. The grasses and other plants were displaying their spring green. The early morning sun helped saturate the colors. Spring was at its finest. I went with the expectation that I might see some different birds. Instead, I discovered that it was time for some landscapes.

The beautiful rocks in this image are granite. The area around this portion of Folsom Lake is called Granite Bay because of the abundance of granite in the area. Like the Sierra Nevada mountains, this area sets on a pluton, a large blob of magma that cooled slowly underground to form granite then was uplifted and exposed.

Please click on caption to see image at higher resolution.

Early Morning at Folsom Lake – P2;
Doton’s Point, Folsom Lake State Recreation Area, Folsom, CA; MAR 2019

These and other images are available to purchase on my website, www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry.klink@earthwatcher.us.

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A Winter Morning in the Gettysburg National Military Park

Confederate Rifles in Winter;
Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, PA; FEB 2019

A few weeks ago, we visited family in the Gettysburg, PA area.  While there, we were treated to some snow and very cold weather. On one early, sunny, morning we drove along Confederate Ave. The street. On Seminary Ridge, overlooks open meadows ringed with farms. The ridge top is where Confederate troops set up their artillery and was the starting point for many Confederate troop assaults. On July 3rd, 1863, it was the site of Pickett’s charge against the troops of Union General George C. Meade.

On this early morning, the guns laid quiet. Sunlight glistened on the icy snow while frost gave trees, weeds and other objects a silvery glow. Though snow adds a burden to our efforts to maintain a normal life and we grow tired of it after a time, a morning like this makes you slow down and appreciate the beauty that nature bestows in winter.

Please click on caption to see images at higher resolution.

Frosty Winter Morning;
Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, PA; FEB 2019
Parot Rifle in Winter;
Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, PA; FEB 2019

Note: These and other images are available for purchase on my website: www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry.klink@earthwatcher.us.

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Sunset through Storm Clouds

Sunset Through Storm Clouds
Between Sexton Mountain Pass and Grants Pass on I-5 in Oregon; DEC 2018

The drive between Redding, CA and Roseburg, OR. on Interstate 5, takes you through some beautiful mountain scenery. Between Redding and the Oregon border, Mt Lassen and Mt Shasta, 2 Cascade volcanoes can be seen. The mountains of California and Oregon’s coastal range line both sides of the highway. Because the area is so close to the Pacific ocean, the area is often blanketed in a layer of stratus clouds and fog. But, don’t think of it as dismal. In the morning and evening, the sun often pushes through the clouds casting spotlights, replete with crepuscular rays, that play on the ridge tops and valleys creating magical landscapes.  

Returning from Seattle, we saw many such vignettes.  One spot made me break the rules and pull off to photograph it. Fortunately, this spot gave us room to get off safely. I hope you’ll agree this image was worth it.

Regards,

Larry

Note: To see image at higher resolution, please click on caption.

Note: This and other images are available to purchase on my website: www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry@earthwatcher.us.

Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

 

The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is another one of Yellowstone National Park’s iconic features. The steep, rugged canyon is cut through volcanic rocks that are colored by deposits of iron. It is being cut by the Yellowstone river which, in other parts of the park, seem calm and serene. But, in the canyon, it is a raging torrent. It tumbles down over Upper Yellowstone Falls (109’) then, after a short distance, tumbles over Lower Yellowstone Falls (308’). After the falls, the river flows its way alongside fumaroles and over cascades as it winds its way through the canyon.

Most of these images are from a recent trip. But I decided to include 3 from previous trips to give you some other perspectives of the canyon. They are Bottom of Lower Yellowstone Falls with rainbow like color, The Beam, a unique winter phenomenon and Lower Yellowstone Falls in Winter by the Light of the Full Moon.

 

Regards,

 

Larry

Note: Click on caption to see image at higher resolution

Notr: These and other images are available to purchase at my website: www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry@earthwatcher.us

Grand Prismatic Spring

The Grand Prismatic Spring is another of Yellowstone’s iconic hydrothermal features. It is the one that looks like a big orange and blue eye. The spring sits along the Firehole River in the general area of the Upper Geyser Basin where Old Faithful resides. It produces a constant flow of water that flows into and heats the Firehole River. To me, the Firehole River is the most fascinating of Yellowstone’s rivers. It flows from Madison Lake, on the continental divide, 21 miles to the Gibbon River at Madison Junction. What fascinates me, is that it travels through the Upper Geyser Basin, where Old Faithful is located, and past the Grand Prismatic Spring. Those and other hydrothermal features dump their water into the Firehole. This raises the temperature 9-18 degrees Fahrenheit.

The pool filled by the Grand Prismatic Spring is very shallow. It is colored by the brown. orange and yellow bacteria and algae that grow in its pool. The sun highlights its colored features and the water reflects the blue of the sky. Steam rising from the spring adds mystery to the landscape. Though you can appreciate the spring by just giving it a cursory walk-by, paying attention to the details and seeing how the light seems to make them change provides a breathtaking experience.

Here is a link to an image that shows the spring in totality: https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/grand-prismatic-spring-close-up-royalty-free-image/136952950; I don’t have one of my own to share.

Note: Click on caption to see higher resolution image.

Note: These and other images are available to purchase on my website: www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry@earthwatcher.us.

Bryce Canyon

Bryce Canyon, in Utah, is stunningly beautiful; especially at sunrise and sunset. It should be on your bucket list. You can enjoy it any time of day but, I recommend being there in the morning, before the sun creeps over the distant mountains and as the sun sets in the evening. The colors saturate, the whites appear almost translucent at hose times and it will take your breath away. If you can, walk the trails that take you below the base and look at the hoodoos face on.

As I looked over the landscape, my thoughts turned to the ancient cities from fantasy and action adventures. Perhaps drawing from Petra in southern Jordan. I can imagine temples and palaces constructed from the hoodoos. I see “impregnable” walls being breached by the barbarians outside. It’s a fun connection.

For me, the process of how the land became to look as it does, enhances its beauty. In this case, water channels away the softer soil, forming the hoodoos. The freeze-thaw cycle sculpts the hoodoos by breaking off chunks. The wind helps sculpt too, but, to a lesser degree. What is left are acres of an orange and cream landscape filled with spectacular hoodoos and the erosional hills and valleys at their base.

I can’t wait to go back. Only this time, I am going to allow a day to hike and see what other treasures I uncover. I wonder what it would like in snow.

Note: Please click on caption to see higher resolution images.

These and other images are available to purchase at my website www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry@earthwatcher.us

More Images From Phoenix

Here are some more images from my recent visit to the Phoenix area.

Note: Click on caption to see  images in larger size.

Note: These and other images are available for purchase on my website: www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry@earthwatcher.us.