An Early Spring Day in Yosemite

We are fortunate this year that El Niño gave us a respite from the drought; a good snow pack in the Sierra!  I moved to northern California 4 ½ years ago.  My wife told me many times that the ephemeral waterfalls, those that dry up and go away quickly, make Yosemite especially beautiful in early spring. But years of drought gave us little snow, leaving those falls dormant or very short lived. I never had a chance to experience them.

Last weekend, we took an overnight visit to Yosemite.  My wife was right, everywhere I looked there was a waterfall that I had never seen before.  Even Horsetail falls, the one that lights up like fire at sunset in February, was still running.  The Merced River was running strongly.  We hiked along the Merced River on the trail to the bridge at Vernal Falls.

Roiling & Thundering

At the juncture of Illouette Creek and the Merced River, the waters roiled over the cascades making whitewater that looked like a giant head of cauliflower and sounded like thunder.  It was amazing.

 

 

 

For me, the real treat was Yosemite Falls.

Base of Lower Yosemite Falls

Base of Lower Yosemite Falls, Yosemite National Park, APR 2016

It, too, thundered from the water crashing over the cliff.  Yosemite Creek was rushing harder and was fuller than I have ever seen it.

Rivulet on Yosemite Creek

This little cascade is normally dry. But the snow melt left Yellowstone Creek running high, fast and loud creating a channel bringing this cascade alive. Yosemite National Park, APR 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But the real treat was a brilliant rainbow in the mist at the base of the lower falls.

20160416-Yosemite-028-WEB

The sun cast a brilliant rainbow in the mist at the base of the Lower Yellowstone Falls. Though other colors could be seen, the sun highlighted the red-orange spectrum casting a golden glow over the rugged landscape. Yosemite National Park, APR 2016

Though other colors could be seen, the sun highlighted the red-orange spectrum casting a golden glow over parts of the landscape.

Yet, as I traveled through Yosemite, another thought struck me.  As humans, ephemeral describes things that come and go quickly; in the span of short periods within our lifetime.  But, solid rock in places like Yosemite last for time frames impossible for humans to comprehend but do eventually wash away.  To the earth is really ephemeral?

A Deceiving Role
A contrast, the juxtaposition of the ephemeral with the lasting. But, which is really ephemeral? That which appears lasting is eroded, one grain at a time, by that which appears ephemeral, until it is eventually washed away. Meanwhile, that which appears epemeral rushes to sea, evaporates and returns to erode again. Yosemite National Park, APR 2016

 

Regards,

Larry

These and other images are available for purchase at my website, http://www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting me at larry@earthwatcher.us.
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